Kit Kat Club

thisiswhiteprivilege:

One major facet of cultural appropriation is taking artifacts that would be violent on the body of a person of color and making them trendy on a white body.

That’s why Forever 21 is able to sell a Black Panther crop top, and why Che Guevara t-shirts are so popular, and why Macklemore can win Grammy’s for writing songs about smelly sheets, and why white drugged out kids can walk around Coachella in tacky “native” headdresses.

When people of color cannot participate in aspects of their culture without persecution, but white people are welcome to those aspects, that’s a major undeniable example of white privilege.

We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty.
nepputune:

So I’ve seen a whole bunch of posts about body positivity. And it would be great, but they’re really bad at actually representing different body types; big girls in particular. So I’ve drawn a comparison.
I’m tired of seeing posts that totally miss the point. Those posts are supposed to make you feel good about your body. But it’s hard for bigger girls to feel good about themselves if they’re represented by women that aren’t big. Fat is okay. But here’s some things that people almost always ignore when drawing bigger ladies:
- Rolls
- Cellulite
- Stretch marks
And some misconceptions/ common mistakes:
- Larger breasts ( a LOT larger) 
- Wider hips
- Same size waist as girls with less body fat
I’m going to put it bluntly: I’m sick of seeing fatter girls be misrepresented. I’m tired of seeing posts getting glory for drawing bigger girls when they don’t. I have yet to see a body positivity post that shows cellulite, stretch marks, folds, and spillage. These things are real, and they’re beautiful.
So try and remember these things next time you try and represent fat girls. Because if you’re not thinking about the “ugly” stuff, you’re doing it wrong.

nepputune:

So I’ve seen a whole bunch of posts about body positivity. And it would be great, but they’re really bad at actually representing different body types; big girls in particular. So I’ve drawn a comparison.

I’m tired of seeing posts that totally miss the point. Those posts are supposed to make you feel good about your body. But it’s hard for bigger girls to feel good about themselves if they’re represented by women that aren’t big. Fat is okay. But here’s some things that people almost always ignore when drawing bigger ladies:

- Rolls

- Cellulite

- Stretch marks

And some misconceptions/ common mistakes:

- Larger breasts ( a LOT larger) 

- Wider hips

- Same size waist as girls with less body fat

I’m going to put it bluntly: I’m sick of seeing fatter girls be misrepresented. I’m tired of seeing posts getting glory for drawing bigger girls when they don’t. I have yet to see a body positivity post that shows cellulite, stretch marks, folds, and spillage. These things are real, and they’re beautiful.

So try and remember these things next time you try and represent fat girls. Because if you’re not thinking about the “ugly” stuff, you’re doing it wrong.

biscuity-boyle:

social justice stuff you see on tumblr is nothing new; these ideas and terminology have been around in activist circles for years. You’re only just finding out about them now because they’ve been brought into the mainstream of a website most of you frequent.

I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.

silversarcasm:

the world is built, like literally physically built, to exclude disabled people and no one seems to care

queerart-civildisobedience:

European accents (and in general white people accents) are commonly perceived as attractive and endearing, while accents from basically any other part of the world are considered to be signs of laziness and disrespect and get routinely made fun of.

queerart-civildisobedience:

European accents (and in general white people accents) are commonly perceived as attractive and endearing, while accents from basically any other part of the world are considered to be signs of laziness and disrespect and get routinely made fun of.

barbidreamdumpster:

if you want to ask a bisexual or asexual person about their sexual history to verify that they’re queer, but you don’t want them to take it the wrong way, try this useful communication technique:

give them twenty dollars and go away.

aheartmadeofglitter:

I hear people say “oh my god I hate people” all the time without backlash. everyone knows they don’t hate every single individual in humanity. they have friends and family they love and hang out with. they simply hate the greedy, corrupted, oppressive nature of some human beings.
but the minute we say something about white people or men, no one seems to understand that it’s the same concept.