Kit Kat Club
You have to act as if it were possible to radically transform the world. And you have to do it all the time.
Angela Davis - from a lecture delivered at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. February 13th, 2014. (via ninjaruski)
Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

That’s thin privilege.
plannedparenthood:


TRUTH. Love this graphic from the Transcending Gender Project.

plannedparenthood:

TRUTH. Love this graphic from the Transcending Gender Project.

punkswithcleankitchens:

"What do you plan to do with that major?"

Global anti-capitalist insurrection.

[I]t is actually more expensive to be poor than not poor. If you can’t afford the first month’s rent and security deposit you need in order to rent an apartment, you may get stuck in an overpriced residential motel. If you don’t have a kitchen or even a refrigerator and microwave, you will find yourself falling back on convenience store food, which—in addition to its nutritional deficits—is also alarmingly overpriced. If you need a loan, as most poor people eventually do, you will end up paying an interest rate many times more than what a more affluent borrower would be charged. To be poor—especially with children to support and care for—is a perpetual high-wire act.

It Is Expensive to Be Poor | The Atlantic  (via america-wakiewakie)

Reblog this forever. I’ll never forget how many of my students in the school I worked in with a 100% free and reduced lunch rate lived in residential motels and how many of them relied on the school to get breakfast and lunch and how often those were their only meals for the day.

Or how my friends who have older cars have to spend so much money repairing them but an older car was all they could afford in the first place.

And how you literally have no safety net because if you already fixed one thing on your car and something else goes a week later, you’ve already spent the little bit of buffer you saved up.

(via raindropprincess)

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

(via moniquill)

black-australia:

I’m seeing a lot of Australians say stuff like, “thank god I’m in Australia!” when they talk about the shooting of Michael Brown… As if police brutality and complete misconduct is not rampant here?

Australia is not a peaceful country where police abide by the law. Around 26% of the nation’s total prison/jail populations are Indigenous (some recent reports are saying that figure has risen to 30% in 2014). The same figure for the Northern Territory is 86%, and 40% for Western Australia. Us Blackfellas are 14.8 times more likely to be arrested than non-Indigenous persons. Ever heard of the Redfern riots? Ever heard of Black Deaths In Custody? They will arrest us and lock us up for trivial offences like swearing, but no way would the same treatment be given to a white person who swears at the police. It’s selective and absolutely racially motivated. Indigenous youth are a major target for the police, also. 

What the community of Ferguson needs right now is solidarity, support and justice. You are not helping by talking about how bad the U.S. treats Black folks but seemingly praising Australia. The police harass, assault and kill us for being Black. Don’t turn a blind eye to that. 

I do not want to see anymore posts that praise Australia for its apparent lack of police brutality. Please.

Et c’est cela, madame, le danger de l’amalgame raciste ; interpréter tous les faits et gestes d’une personne au regard de sa religion (supposée ou non). Vous n’avez pas une seconde pensé que cette femme puisse ne pas se baigner pour d’autres raisons que sa religion car, pour vous, elle n’est que sa religion.
Crêpe Georgette - Réponse à Nadine Morano (via mamie-caro)
The German playwright Bertolt Brecht (1978) summarizes the point: ‘Good or bad, a play always includes an image of the world… . There is no play and no theatrical performance which does not in some way affect the dispositions and conceptions of the audience. Art is never without consequences’ (150–1). Brecht’s point can be generalized to apply to all texts. Another way of saying this would be simply to argue that all texts are ultimately political. That is, they offer competing ideological significations of the way the world is or should be. Popular culture is thus, as Hall (2009a) claims, a site where ‘collective social understandings are created’: a terrain on which ‘the politics of signification’ are played out in attempts to win people to particular ways of seeing the world (122–23).
John Storey, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture. An Introduction
privileged people: the problem isnt the actual problem!! the problem is that youre not reacting to the problem the way i feel you should be reacting to the problem!! even though im not experiencing the problem in any way therefore i really shouldnt dictate the way the problem should be solved but--- HEY LISTEN TO ME YOU HAVE TO LISTEN TO ME THATS EQUALITY!!!
Oppressed groups are frequently placed in the situation of being listened to only if we frame our ideas in the language that is familiar to and comfortable for a dominant group. This requirement often changes the meaning of our ideas and works to elevate the ideas of dominant groups.
Patricia Hill Collins  (via ethiopienne)